Rosemary, About the Different Rosemary Varieties

Gorizia Rosemary bed

Rosemary is common in the kitchen as a seasoning for lamb, pork, and chicken. It is commonly used to enhance breads, potatoes, and pizzas as well. But take care if you are not accustom to cooking with this fresh herb, a little goes a long way.

Aside from its culinary benefits, Rosemary is a very desirable ornamental in the garden. If in a temperate zone it can be formed as a low, stately hedge. You may have seen it groomed into cone or sphere shaped topiaries, even sold as miniature Christmas trees. Rosemary is perfect for mixed pots, as long as they are well drained, because they have an interesting texture that contrasts nicely next to other herbs or bedding plants.

Rosemary is a common scent in cleaning and cosmetic products such as soaps, shampoos, and as a hair rinse for brunettes to add shine. Washer women used to lay sprigs of the herb on their freshly washed linen to perfume them and repel moths. It is documented as an antidepressant and has antibacterial properties. A few leaves steeped in boiling water is a nice inhalant or a tea to relieve head colds, to soothe sore throats, cure bad breath, and reduce gas. Historically, it was used as incense to purify the air in sick rooms, and was recorded that during the plague of 1665 people wore bundles of the herb around their necks to ward off germs and to ease the smell of death. “There’s Rosemary, that’s for remembrance.” So said the disturbed Ophelia to Hamlet in Shakespeare’s tragedy, listing the herb among other plants well known in medieval folklore. Rosemary is still considered to promote memory because its smell is a stimulant, making the mind alert and clearing the senses.

Listed below are our Rosemary varieties and their particular attributes, all of them have similar taste, aroma, and culinary use:

‘Arp’ Rosemary, originally found in Arp, Texas, is regarded as the hardiest Rosemary cultivar. Edible blue flowers and a faint lemony scent. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Common’ Rosemary is an upright type that grows 2 to 4 feet tall; bears delicate light blue flowers. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Gorizia’ Rosemary grows to about 30 inches and has stout, large, flat leaves. This one is mildew resistant. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Lockwood de Forest’ a cascading Rosemary known for dark green foliage and lavender flowers. Blooms repeatedly. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Prostrate’ Rosemary works wonderfully for hanging baskets or a creeping ground cover in warm climates, it only grows 4 to 8 inches tall. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Salem’ Rosemaryoften grown as a hedge in warmer climates. Mild pine flavor. Does well in containers. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Spice Island’ Rosemary has a pungent flavor, is great for cooking and pruning into topiaries. It is an upright type that grows 24 to 30 inches with blue flowers. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.

‘Tuscan Blue’ Rosemary is a tall variety with broad leaves, great for potpourri, and for seasoning white meats, vegetables, and soups. Learn more about this variety including sowing information.