Herbs for Shady Areas

Herbs for Shady Areas

Herbs for Shady Areas

When selecting plants for your landscape, consider the exceptional qualities of herbs. Whether your gardening style is free-form and natural, or plotted and formal, herbs deserve a place in your landscape. Herbs are easy to care for and provide texture, contrast and form – with the special bonus of amazing fragrances. Most herbs prefer full sun, but if you have a shady spot you might want to try a few of these herbs that thrive in shade:

 

Catmint Walker’s Low – blooms all summer. Very drought tolerant. Irresitible to butterflies and hummingbirds. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Catnip – very tough and can handle poor soil, heat, and drought. It is said to relieve sleeplessness, anxiety, and restlessness when brewed into a tea. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

German Chamomile – Very easy to grow. Chamomile tea is one of the most popular herbal teas, for its flavor and relaxing sleep-inducing properties. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Roman Chamomile is a perennial, unlike German Chamomile, which is actually an entirely different species. It is also used in herbal teas and as a ground cover since it doesn’t grow very tall. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Chervil – Fresh and pungent, with hints of licorice, cucumber, and parsley flavor. Hot weather will cause the plants to bolt. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Garlic Chives – combination of onion and garlic flavor. Starry white flowers in spring. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Onion Chives – Smaller than garlic chives with light pinkish-purple flowers. Taste like mild green onions. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Cilantro – one of the most distinctively flavored herbs. Popular in salsa and a staple in Thai, Indian, Caribbean and Mexican cuisine. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Comfrey – flowers change from pink to blue as they open in the summer. While it can be eaten it has been discovered recently to be dangerous if consumed in liberal doses. Because of its rich nutrient value this plant can be used to make a perfect fertilizer. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Lemon Balm – easy to grow, very hardy. Can be invasive, so carefully consider your spot or plant in container. Lemon scent and flavor adds a tangy zest to any dish. Great in iced tea! Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Peppermint – probably the most recognized herb of all. Excellent for tea and candy because it has a sweeter scent than other mints. All mints will thrive in shade to partial shade areas in the garden, the majority of them can be very invasive but hearty growers. Experiment with the different varieties like: apple, chocolate, curly, ginger, julep, orange, pineapple, spearmint, or variegated peppermint. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Pineapple Mint – has a fresh fruity aroma. The leaves have a furrier texture than regular mints. the creamy white variegation looks very pretty in the garden or in mixed pots. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Curled Parsley – and its close relative, Italian parsley are perhaps the most versatile and widely used herbs of all. Curled Parsley is actually a biennial as it reseeds itself. Caterpillars adore it; you will be hatching beautiful monarch butterflies and others in late summer. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Pennyroyal – while not edible, it is very useful as an insect repellent and low growing ground cover. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Rosemary (common) – will thrive in sun or shade, but may not put on as many flowers if kept in a shady spot. It is important to have well-drained soil. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Rosemary Prostrate – a trailing variety of Rosemary. Great in mixed pots or container, but does equally well in rock gardens. Attractive to bees and butterflies. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.

Sweet Woodruff – ornamental plant that makes a beautiful ground cover under trees and other protected areas. The lacy white flowers have a vanilla scent. Learn more about this variety including helpful hints, tips and sowing information.